Home > Uncategorized > Off-pool pain: Treating swimmer’s shoulder

Off-pool pain: Treating swimmer’s shoulder

April 15, 2013

The shoulder is made of some of the most important joints in the body which allow a wide range of arm motion. Without these, people are left practically incapacitated as they are unable to perform the most basic activities of daily living.

 

Image Source: intechopen.com

Image Source: intechopen.com

 

However, shoulder joints can only take so much pressure and force. Sometimes, people perform activities that can wear out these joints, causing them to be irritated and inflamed. When this happens, a person may develop a condition called “shoulder impingement syndrome.” It is also known as “swimmer’s shoulder,” as it has become a common occurrence among swimmers who require the excessive use of these joints in their craft. The condition results into symptoms like persistent shoulder pain, loss of shoulder strength and motion, and radiating pain from the front of the shoulder to the side of the arm.

Surgical management of the pathologic shoulder

In mild cases, the doctor may recommend nonsurgical treatments, such as rest, NSAIDs, steroid injection, and physical therapy. There are times, however, when these modes of treatment are ineffective and the pain continues to persist. In these cases, doctors recommend surgery.

 

Image Source: ehow.com

Image Source: ehow.com

 

Surgery may be performed via arthroscopic (insertion of fiberoptic scope into the shoulder) or open (invasive and direct manipulation of the rotator cuff) surgery, depending on the patient’s fitness and the surgeon’s recommendations. The goal of surgery is to “create more space for the rotator cuff” by removing an inflamed part of the bursa.

Apart from the abovementioned technique, surgeons may also perform anterior acromioplasty, the surgical reshaping of the acromion (which forms the highest point of the shoulder) to decompress the supraspinatus portion (the most injured part) of the rotator cuff.

Image Source: vjortho.com

Image Source: vjortho.com

 

After surgery, the patient is allowed a period of rehabilitation wherein the arm is placed in a sling to allow for early healing. Complete recovery may take from 2 to 4 months, but it may extend up to a year depending on several instances.

Surgical treatment of shoulder impingement is available under Satori World Medical’s Global Network. Visit this website for the list of procedures available under Satori’s Global Network.

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